Tuesday | April 21, 2015
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Their Views

Cartoon for April 21

Apr 21 2015 - 12:05am || Comments

The world as seen by cartoonist Tom Stiglich, Creators.com.

  • Posted: Mar 20 2015 - 1:00am

    The world as seen by cartoonist Tom Stiglich, Creators.com.

  • Posted: Mar 20 2015 - 1:00am

    A million-plus protesters in the streets and a 13 percent approval rating tend to concentrate a politician’s mind. Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff’s proposed anti-corruption legislation will help her contain the damage of a bribery and kickback investigation, but a better response would be simply to get out of the way of Brazil’s finance minister, Joaquim Levy.

  • | Posted: Mar 20 2015 - 1:00am

    WASHINGTON — Dick Durbin, the No. 2 Democrat in the Senate, was getting his demagogue on.

  • Posted: Mar 19 2015 - 1:00am

    The world as seen by cartoonist Steve Breen, The San Diego Union-Tribune.

  • | Posted: Mar 19 2015 - 1:00am

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ideas fly from Gov. John Kasich like sparks from a flint. While explaining his prison reforms, he interrupts himself midsentence — his sentences, like some E. E. Cummings poems, are unpunctuated — to praise a Delaware church that buys prom dresses for low-income high school girls. His spirit would add spice and his policies would add substance to the Republican presidential contest.

  • Posted: Mar 19 2015 - 1:00am

    Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, D, signed into law a remarkable reform Monday that will sweep away one of the greatest barriers to the ballot box: The gratuitously complicated, opt-in voter registration process. While much of the country is making voting more difficult, Oregon is pushing forward with innovative voting reform that should be universally praised. Other states — or, better yet, federal standards — should follow.

  • Posted: Mar 18 2015 - 1:00am

    Four years ago this week, people across Syria began marching peacefully to demand democratic reforms.

  • Posted: Mar 18 2015 - 1:00am

    The world as seen by cartoonist Tom Stiglich, Creators.com.

  • | Posted: Mar 18 2015 - 1:00am

    Why did Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel feel the need to wag the dog in Washington? For that was, of course, what he was doing in his anti-Iran speech to Congress. If you’re seriously trying to affect U.S. foreign policy, you don’t insult the president and so obviously align yourself with his political opposition. No, the real purpose of that speech was to distract the Israeli electorate with saber-rattling bombast, to shift its attention away from the economic discontent that, polls suggest, was a tough issue for Netanyahu in this election.

  • Posted: Mar 17 2015 - 1:00am

    The world as seen by cartoonist Marshall Ramsey, The Clarion-Ledger.

  • Posted: Mar 17 2015 - 1:00am

    For years, we’ve been hearing that print is dead and the electronic reading medium is the future — the whole future. And it’s not hard to imagine a day when no tree has to die for people to get all the reading they could want.

  • Posted: Mar 17 2015 - 1:00am

    By MICHAEL GERSON

  • Posted: Mar 17 2015 - 1:00am

    Remember how backers of the 2014 farm bill promised that it would reform costly and wasteful agriculture subsidies and save taxpayers money?

  • Posted: Mar 16 2015 - 1:00am

    Americans love democracy and freedom — so long as there’s no quiz involved. The numbers are depressing: One in four Americans do not know that the U.S. declared its independence from England. One in three cannot name a single branch of government. Three in four don’t know why the Civil War was fought.

  • Posted: Mar 16 2015 - 1:00am

    A European diplomat ruefully observed to us that a letter by Senate Republicans to Iran’s leadership would provide the country’s foreign minister with a convenient talking point when negotiations on the Iranian nuclear program resume on Monday. Mohammad Javad Zarif will probably protest that his efforts to persuade hard-liners in Tehran to accept a compromise accord have been undercut by the GOP’s letter, which pointed out that the deal would not be binding on Congress or the next president.