Your Views for February 22


The ‘haole’ debate

I only wish to add my thoughts to the “haole” debate that I have read about in the Commentary section. I am a white man from the mainland (Minnesota). I come to your great island once every three to four years. My wife and I rent a small home and live simply for two weeks.

I will not begin to add to the history of the Hawaiian word, “haole.” I do, however, wish to add my thoughts to this discussion.

As … one who comes to the islands, I have noticed this about the use of the word haole. Most times, when I enter a place or a business, I am greeted with the words, “Welcome, haole! Come in, sit down.” When I hear these words, I feel good.

Then there are many times that I will do something or I say something that I do not mean to do, and that offends someone greatly. They will yell at me or confront me and say to me, “You damn haole.” They say many other words which I will not repeat.

Has the word become more than the origin it was meant to be? Have we all become angry with our own feelings?

I love and care for mankind. Much of the white man’s history is not a good one. You can ask the Dakota/Lakota Indian friends I have here in Minnesota.

Please do not blame me. If I could, I would change our history.

When do we stop changing good words into bad words?

Thom M. Rigger

Coon Rapids, Minnesota

Good luck, recruits

The Thursday, Feb. 20, Tribune-Herald’s first two pages had articles involving robberies, kidnapping and even murder. My mind went immediately to the type of household and parents these alleged perpetrators came from. The scenarios are endless!

When I reached the Community section, my feelings were lifted to see all the new, fresh, eager and proud faces of the Hawaii Police Department’s 81st recruit class.

It also brought a smile remembering my son at his police academy graduation 30 years ago. The same look on his face was like the glow on the 81st’s faces.

Good luck to all the new members of the HPD! Be safe, guardians of our welfare.

Carmine Spada

Pahoa

No idiots, imbeciles

On a daily basis the Tribune-Herald publishes the very educational column titled, “This day in History.” The Tribune-Herald wrote on Feb. 20, 1907: Theodore Roosevelt signed an immigration act which excluded “idiots, imbeciles, feeble-minded persons, epileptics, and insane persons” from being admitted to the United States.

Given the complete lack of integrity and the incompetence of today’s Congress by all parties, would it not be nice to apply this old law to our present Congress? There would be nobody left!

Arthur Warren

Keaau

 

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