Nation briefs for January 16


NM shooting suspect’s family ‘heartbroken’

ROSWELL, N.M. (AP) — The 12-year-old boy who opened fire on a crowd of students in a New Mexico middle school gym planned the attack and warned some classmates to stay away moments before the gunfire rang out, investigators said Wednesday.

State Police Chief Pete Kassetas said it appeared the victims in Tuesday’s shooting at Berrendo Middle School in Roswell — an 11-year-old boy and 13-year-old girl — were chosen randomly.

The shotgun used by the boy came from his family’s home, and he had three rounds of ammunition, Kassetas said at a news conference.

He declined to speculate on a motive.

The 11-year-old boy who was shot in the face and neck remained in critical condition Wednesday at University Medical Center in Lubbock, Texas. The 13-year-old girl, identified as Kendal Sanders, was in satisfactory condition with injuries to the right shoulder. The family of the injured boy asked his name be withheld while he recovers.

Meanwhile, the suspected shooter’s family issued a statement Wednesday saying they were heartbroken and their remorse could not be put into words. They said the two children who were injured have been in their thoughts and prayers.

“We are horribly sad over this tragedy on so many levels,” the family stated. “We are praying that God will be with everyone who has been affected.”

The family added it will cooperate with law enforcement to “piece together how this awful tragedy occurred.”

Police have not released the boy’s name, and the Associated Press typically doesn’t identify juveniles accused of crimes.

Police didn’t say when charges would be filed, only they were working with the district attorney’s office. Kassetas described the case as complex.

Washington state pitches more help for Boeing

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Even after giving Boeing Co. one of the largest packages of tax breaks in U.S. history, state leaders in Washington told the aerospace giant in a proposal released Wednesday they are ready to do even more.

In the 164-page proposal obtained under public disclosure laws, Gov. Jay Inslee and his administration vowed to work with Boeing on water quality issues, workers’ compensation costs and improved transportation infrastructure.

State officials identified more than $4 billion in possible transportation projects they deemed “key to Boeing’s success in Washington state.” Lawmakers have yet to approve a transportation package proposed last year that would include those projects.

“Washington’s government is stable and is dedicated to partnering with Boeing and its supply chain to create the most competitive economic environment possible,” officials wrote in the pitch.

Washington leaders approved nearly $9 billion in tax breaks in November to aid Boeing, and the additional written proposal was designed to woo Boeing as the company considered competing bids from other states interested in attracting work.

The bidding process became unnecessary after machinists in Puget Sound voted earlier this month to approve contract concessions that led to a promise by Boeing to build the 777X in the region.

 

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