State roundup for March 1


Scientists monitor sharks

HONOLULU (AP) — University of Hawaii researchers have captured hours of shark-cam video that reinforces the fear tiger sharks strike in other animals.

The video cams of different shark species off the Oahu coast have provided insights about survival behavior, including animals relying on each other for protection.

Carl Meyer, a researcher with the university’s Institute of Marine Biology, says nothing really seems to want to hang out with a tiger shark.

Researchers say sandbar sharks, Galapagos and hammerheads prefer to swim together for protection against the fierce predators.

Scientists also have turned to technology developed in Hawaii. They insert a device into the sharks that enables them to monitor digestive behavior before the device is regurgitated.

Researchers hope to expand their studies to sharks in Maui waters.

Garbage truck kills woman

HONOLULU (AP) — A 70-year-old Honolulu woman has died after being run over by a city garbage truck in Kalihi.

Barbara Kato was the third person fatally injured in Oahu by a garbage truck in just over a year.

One of the two other incidents involved a city garbage truck and the other one involved a privately owned vehicle.

Kato was struck Thursday morning by a truck driven by a 57-year-old woman. She was taken to Queen’s Medical Center, where she died.

Mayor Kirk Caldwell says the city will cooperate in the investigation.

University forms partnerships

HONOLULU (AP) — The University of Hawaii at Manoa is forming partnerships in indigenous research with two New Zealand universities.

The partnerships with the University of Auckland and Massey University aim to uplift the mana, or spiritual power, and aspirations of indigenous peoples.

The University of Hawaii at Manoa said Wednesday the partnerships have already been fruitful.

The UH medical school and a network from the University of Auckland won a five-year grant from the U.S. National Institutes of Health that will allow students to experience three months of health research training in New Zealand.

Native Hawaiian Health Department Chairman Keaweaimoku Kaholokula says the grant will allow the school to help indigenous undergraduate and graduate students to become biomedical and behavioral scientists.

 

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