Your Views for December 27


Why they protest

My guess is that Mel Holden (Your Views, Dec. 26) has never been a union man, but that’s only a guess. If he were, would he be dissing the workers who’ve been out protesting a wage grievance with Walgreen’s, come rain or come shine, for such a long time now?

He suggests they “get over it” and “move on,” because their presence is disturbing.

I’ve got news for him: It’s meant to be disturbing. All civil protest is meant to be disturbing. How else to rouse the spirit necessary for change?

Perhaps if the Walgreen’s management would sit down and bargain in good faith with the union, a settlement could be reached that would be satisfactory to both sides, and the union could pack up its banner and the men could go home. Until then, their presence by the highway reminds us that workers’ rights weren’t a gift from the capitalists, they were fought for and won through protest and negotiation.

Patrick Donovan

Keaau

Make the leap

Who doesn’t need a second chance? Who doesn’t need forgiveness or a resurrection of hope? Even if you are not a believer in the religious aspect of Christmas, now is still a good time for a renewal of your spirit. Come join in the celebration at various houses of worship this Christmas season.

Even if you are not convinced or completely believe, join in and participate. In general, there is no requirement that you have to believe first before you participate or serve. Sometimes belief comes in the doing. If the belief never comes while participating, your time could still have been spent in a charity service that churches and other places of worship often sponsor, or making lasting bonds with (hopefully) positive, hopeful people while serving.

Is religion a crutch? Can a crutch become a tool? Can this belief become a great truth and wonderful part of you? We all need crutches. We all have some failing or injury in some way or other. It doesn’t have to be physical. It can be in your heart, mind, body or soul. You have a choice; you can call it a crutch or simply see it as another way of being more of who you really want to be.

And, actually, admitting weakness to yourself is strength.

Take the plunge, instead of fence-sitting. No one can be certain of all the answers in life or after. Taking a chance is real life. This leap of faith could actually be a small hop that covers a huge chasm.

Too often we focus too much on our differences and what separates, rather than our sameness and what unites us as human beings.

Ultimately, it is good to have a group of people who have faith that a supreme being wants them to behave by rules that have been eons-tested for a better society.

Who doesn’t need to know that they have a special purpose? Why not believe that there is something more to our lives than birth, a short existence, and then nothingness?

A famous religious leader once said that choosing faith could be the most eternal decision you make. But if the true believers are wrong, then it would simply be life-changing. Not a bad bargain either way.

Leighton Loo

Honolulu

 

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