Your Views for April 27


DLNR playing God

I don’t understand. To protect the palila bird, they send helicopters and sharp shooters in to slaughter the sheep, goats, pepekaula and pigs.

How do you think the helicopter noise and exhaust affects the palila birds?

What about the wind that the choppers create blowing the little birds right out of their nests and the nest right behind them? What about the dead carcasses left to feed and propagate the rats, mice and mongoose? These rodents eat bird eggs.

Now on their plate the Department of Land and Natural Resources wants to eradicate many of our birds, toads, frogs and lizards. I’m going to hate to see the population of our warm-weathered insects multiply with out any predator to keep them at bay.

All of this is in the name of grand federal funds and so-called jobs through grants. This makes me sick!

Why don’t they eradicate the people who come here and want to change things that cannot be changed? There are invasive humans, who bring invasive species. Let’s start with eradicating these humans.

I’m beginning to think that the DLNR think they are God, and I don’t think God looks kindly on that.

Lani Kay Ka‘awaloa

Pahoa

Not so accomplished

I bet one thing that will be missing from the new George Bush library will be the banner saying, “MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.”

James Haines

Pahoa

Compromise needed

I am writing in response to your front-page article on Friday (Tribune-Herald, “Smoked Out?”). I do support the ban, but I feel that they should meet the smokers half way and give them a designated area away from other people — i.e., somewhere in the parking area.

Remember, these smokers pay higher taxes than everyone else and would like to enjoy the public places that people enjoy. Smokers are treated like second-class citizens and already they feel the pressure. I know because I am a smoker.

Now, what about the e-cigarette? Are we going to be fined for smoking that, too?

D. Nishimoto

Kurtistown

Vote in HPP

Four seats on the owners association of Hawaiian Paradise Park are up for selection in the coming weeks. If you are in the districts where new board members are being selected, please vote!

The “town” of Hawaiian Paradise Park has 11,500 people (2010 census) and growing! As taxpayers, people living in Hawaiian Paradise Park must begin work to get their fair share of county funding and programs.

Begin by voting in the board election and attending general membership meetings and board meetings. Be informed, and ask questions of the board, particularly the board member who represents your district. Learn and contribute to shaping the future of Hawaiian Paradise Park.

Lawrence Brennan

Hawaiian Paradise Park

 

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