Your Views for December 21


How to fight evil

The president has called for “meaningful action” to prevent such shootings. “As a country, we have been through this too many times,” he said.

Meaningful action? What does that mean in this case, and why has there not been any meaningful action taken to date in previous mass shooting cases?

I think we as a nation need to come to terms with what we are dealing with here. I think it is direct evil. Even Muslim extremist terrorists love children — in most cases, not all. They have their direct evil problem, too. I think the best way to deal with it is to ask God for intervention. I am not sure how to do this, other than just ask. This would be a good question for the theologians in the country. I would invite them to step up. We need a long-term solution.

In the short term, I would like to talk about tactics. Consider this: The next mass killer is watching the television news right now. He sees all the fear. He even sees the president of the United States shed a tear on national TV. Seeing all this in the national news for most people would invoke emotions of sympathy and an overwhelming urge to help somehow.

Not so for evil. Evil sees power. Evil feeds on power and the perceived weakness in others.

People need to morn and express their fear, but it should not be on national TV for the next shooter to see. If they — the media — want to interview someone, they should interview SWAT team members in full battle dress and ask them how they feel.

Evil people are cowards. There is a tactical advantage here. In other words, an evil person might run up and kick a poodle just for fun because it is perceived as weak and defenseless. An evil person won’t, however, run up to a pit bull and kick it, because they are cowards and there would be a price to pay for kicking a pit bull. On the other hand, a courageous person might just defend their beloved poodle against both the evil person and the pit bull, if necessary.

Courage is the way to deal with evil in the short term. In the newspaper recently, there was an article about returning veterans not finding jobs on the Big Island. I think they need to be working on school grounds. Veterans know about courage. They know about teamwork service and sacrifice. One committed soldier could have stopped that gunman — even if it cost him his own life.

David L. Littrell

Hilo

‘Murdering tools’

It was not violent impulses and an unstable mind that killed the innocent in Newtown, Conn. It was the lethal combination of violent intent and gun access that was responsible for the horrific slaughter.

As the small New England community attends funerals and memorial services for their dead, I grieve with them. I offer my deepest sympathies now, for the future and, in particular, for the grief spasms that the winter holiday season will bring for the rest of their lives.

Please join me in writing to our legislators to urge stronger gun control now. We can never guarantee that people will curb their desires to harm others, but we can make it more difficult to have access to the murdering tools of firearms.

Jeri Gertz

Hilo

 

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