Your Views for January 15


Keep trail open

It was good to see the Hawaii Tribune-Herald story by Tom Callis on Sunday, “Building violations net large fines.”

It is disturbing, however, to read that “the county has authorized public access to a landing below the house to be closed temporarily during construction.” As the article states, the access is currently open because a stop-work order is in effect.

That public access trail to the historic Pepe‘ekeo Landing is a great resource for people who fish and/or hike. The construction site is well barricaded from the pedestrian trail.

Regardless, the general public should not be denied access to their trail because someone is building a house nearby. The portion of the fence blocking the construction site is appropriate; however, the portion of the fence and the gate over the trail should be removed immediately and permanently for the benefit of the trail users.

While it may be open now, as long as it is there, it can be closed. This particular portion of the public trail and seaside is incredibly scenic and historic. Longtime residents of Pepe‘ekeo have a deep attachment to this area. They should not be barred from it.

Ed Johnston

Pepe‘ekeo

Judges failed us

The wrong person, or persons, was charged with the death of a 3-year-old.

On Sunday, Jan. 13, the Tribune-Herald’s story about the death of a 3-year-old evokes thoughts of the judicial system and the calibre of drivers here on the Big Island.

After (the driver) went to court more than once for the same driving and safety violations, what were the judges thinking? Even a phrenologist would be able to conclude that multiple violations warrant some kind of jail time, which might have prevented the death of the child.

I consistently advocate that highways and roads are only as good as the people driving on them. The bumper stickers that read, “Slow Down — You Are Not on the Mainland,” should read, “Be Careful — You Are Driving on the Big Island.”

Judges, please remember: The next victim could be one of yours.

May Joel rest in the arms of his lord.

Carmine Spada

Pahoa

It’s not 1787

When our Founding Fathers created the Constitution, they put together an incredible document that has served our country well. Still, these were, after all, human beings — men who could not possibly have envisioned the world we live in today.

So, for just a moment, try to imagine that in 1787, a madman brandishing a “magic musket” had walked into a Philadelphia school, slaughtering 20 colonial children in a matter of seconds.

I wonder how that would have affected the wording of the Second Amendment.

Dale Crabtree

Volcano

 

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