Your Views for July 16


Support Bill 79

Here’s why I support GMO prohibition: We don’t know enough about GMOs, and they cannot be contained.

There is no proof that GMO’s are safe. The biotech industry convinced the FDA, USDA, and EPA that GMOs are “substantially equivalent” — that is despite the addition of foreign genes from animals, other plants, viruses and bacteria. Most GMOs have only gone through a 90-day study with rats — no human testing. I can’t even find any data about GMO papaya testing on rats. Why doesn’t the papaya industry post the information?

What about the inserted antibiotic marker genes? What about the recently found “viral gene segment” in the GMO papayas that was not reported to or studied by regulators? The creators of the GMO papaya are still in denial.

It’s impossible to be transparent about something you can never completely understand.

GMOs consistently cross-pollinate with non-GMO crops. Papaya, corn, canola and sugar beets are just a few examples of GMO plants that are recorded as having high rates of pollen transfer to non-GMO plants. Coexistence is a myth created by advocates of GMOs.

Papaya is the main GMO that has proliferated the island, and I am OK with giving them an exemption. Bill 79, with no other exemptions, would stop the rest of the GMO tsunami heading our way.

Please let your County Council representatives know how you feel about GMOs in your garden.

Alison Watts

Hilo

Bad for birds

I want to thank Joan Oviatt (Your Views, June 19) for calling our attention to the efforts of Frannie Pueo and fellow members of Hui Pono Holohololona on behalf of feral cats.

It is with regret that I am reminding us that wildlife departments in concerned states such as Tennessee warn us that “free-roaming house cats are the greatest enemy of birds and other small game.”

It is an irony that the compassionate program for feral cats deprives us of the voices of Japanese white-eyes, doves and palilas, to name a few.

So many of the song-birds of the eastern U. S. have been killed by pesticides and predatory, free-roaming house cats that Rachel Carson wrote of it in her book, “Silent Spring.” The ‘aina depends upon our aware stewardship.

Spike Werner

Hilo

Tax and spend

The county is getting more money by increasing bus fares and car taxes. I wonder what they will spend it on? More services? Not bloody likely! I bet somebody needs another raise!

Usually, increases in fees and taxes are raised for a specific purpose or project, not just because the bureaucrats want more money (don’t they always?).

As council member (Brenda) Ford pointed out, this is not the case here. Nonspecific money going into the general fund has a peculiar habit of sticking to bureaucrats’ pockets (like the council’s new personal slush funds) or their paychecks.

That’s county self-service: All for one, one for me.

William Wade

Kehena Beach

 

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