Your Views for March 16


Bad bus service

What’s up with the crappy Hele-On shuttle service in Waimea? Many of the drivers have no idea what good customer service is! On one occasion, I boarded the bus at Kahilu Theatre across from the post office. It was raining, and I already had a bad day.

“Dis not a designated bus stop,” the driver said. “Next time I see you here, I’m not gonna stop fo’ you!”

On another occasion, I board the shuttle across the Shell station near Tutu’s House.

“I’m not gonna stop here any more, madam. It’s too dangerous!”

Picking up passengers across from the Shell station is dangerous. But, as a taxpaying customer, how am I supposed to know what areas are safe for drivers to pull over and stop to pick up passengers, especially if I’m nowhere near a designated bus stop?

Why are drivers putting the blame on their passengers? Do county drivers not understand that we are taxpayers? We are paying them! And this is the service we get? What if a tourist decides to use the shuttle bus service and gets the same service?

In addition to such crappy customer service, I also caught one driver using her cellphone while driving.

I saw a public service announcement in Hong Kong. It portrayed a “before” and “after” scenario. A passenger on a bus misses her stop. She asks the driver if he can left her off at an undesignated stop.

The driver says, “Why don’t you pay attention?” Naturally, the passenger is unhappy about the service.

In the “after” scene, the passenger misses her stop and asks the driver if he can let her off at an undesignated stop. The driver says, “I’m sorry madam. I can’t let you off here. But I can let you off at the next bus stop.” The customer obliges.

Shuttle bus drivers could learn a lesson from this public service announcement.

Jada Rufo

Waimea

Angry insults

Bonnie Goodell is partly right, but mostly wrong, in her letter about Faye Hanohano’s racist insults (Tribune-Herald, Your Views). Yes, racial nicknames can be used in humor.

The wonderful work of Frank DeLima is a good example. So is Keola and Kapono Beamer’s song, “Mr. Sun Cho Lee.”

But using those terms in anger and disparagement is not being funny, nor is it being honest. One does not have to insult people in order to recognize differences.

Ms. Goodell is right that accepting ethnic differences is good.

She’s dead wrong in thinking that using offensive ethnic slurs is the way to do it.

Anger is not humor. Insult is not acceptance.

Ms. Goodell — and Ms. Hanohano — should understand that.

Dan Lindsay

Hilo

 

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