Your Views for March 19


‘Fracking’ problems

There are two types of geothermal resources, and what we have in Hawaii is not the clean, green type they have in California and Iceland. But the federal government bought it; they don’t know what they bought; we didn’t get what we were supposed to; and they don’t care. C’esspool la vie!

Will there be an acceptable buffer zone between established residential districts and the industrial operations of those companies that want to “frack” the main Hawaiian Islands for geothermal?

After the state Legislature rather gratuitously passed Acts 55 and 97, don’t count on it. Will we be exposed to more hydrogen sulfide gas from large releases, like the one we had in lower Puna on the afternoon of March 13? Probably.

But fear not. They won’t call it fracking, due to its massive unpopularity. They’ll call it “enhanced” geothermal, just like torture wasn’t torture when it was an “enhanced” interrogation technique. Such is the nature of semantics.

Many on the mainland leased their land for fracking, and quite a few have regretted it, especially after their tap water became contaminated and flammable from proprietary fracking chemistry.

Wouldn’t it be something if the fire department responded to a fire and the water in their tank was flammable? After doing that to our water, they’d gladly sell us desalinization plants at a hideous profit.

Dave Kisor

Pahoa

Thanks, Samaritan

Regarding the Big Island International Marathon, half marathon and 5K: Thank You, whoever you are, for helping me get up after I tripped and fell on the Bayfront raised sidewalk during the March 17 race. With a block to the finish line, I was only focused on my goal to finish the race and did not properly thank you.

My wife asks me, “Why does a 74-year-old deaf and blind man want to race?” I always say, “This is my last race.”

I started running at age 62, and Sunday was my 11th time running the 5k in the Big Island International Marathon. This race was my most challenging as I crossed the finish line dripping blood.

I think “Big Dog” understands why this old man keeps on “forever running with the Big Dog.” I am sure he was watching the race proceed. And I am sure that everyone putting on the race this year without him has a new appreciation of Wayne “Big Dog” Joseph, who started the Hilo marathon and ran it for 15 years. I, and all the runners, appreciate all the organizers and volunteers who worked so hard to make it another great race day in Hilo.

I especially want to thank Eddie Yokoyama, who took the time to get me cleaned up and disinfected and, of course my wife, who helped.

I am looking forward to one-more “one last race” next March 16, 2014. Anyone interested in donating to the Wayne “Big Dog” Joseph Scholarship, or graduating seniors interested in filing a scholarship application, can go to the Big Island Road Runners website for information, or contact Randee Joseph at rarkin24@aol.com.

Richard Alderson

Hakalau

 

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