Your Views for November 2


Answers are needed

In the Oct. 9 edition of the Tribune-Herald, writer Tom Callis fails to get answers to the most important question about the Pacific Resource Partnership in his article, “Oahu PAC seeks influence.”

The question the people of Hawaii County really need answered is why would an Oahu-based PAC spend over $110,000 on Hawaii County Council races?

To answer the question, you need look no farther than the two groups that jointly operate the PRP, the Carpenters Union and the Hawaii Contractors Union.

These are two groups that depend on development for their livelihoods, and it really has to make you wonder what promises have Zendo Kern, Fred Blas, Valerie Poindexter and Sonny Shimaoka made in order to secure over $100,000 in support for their campaigns.

What will happen if all four of these candidates make it onto the Hawaii County Council with PRP money leading the way?

When you head to the polls for the Nov. 6 General Election, please support candidates who have not already been bought and paid for.

Ryan Hori

Hilo

Socialism is bad

Response to J. Stoeckel’s letter (Your Views, Oct. 25): I find it very curious that the people he quotes as an answer to fascism, are either communists, national socialists or Kennsian socialists, who themselves are fascists who like to use the Orwellian tactic of “newspeak” to change word connotation and paint their opponents as the fascists.

There is nothing in communism, national socialism or any other socialist system that uplifts the vast majority of people. Quite the contrary, it keeps them subservient to the government.

Chuck Sperry

Hawaiian Paradise Park

Evacuation criticism

Mahalo to all who worked, volunteered, or helped in anyway during the latest tsunami evacuation. We in the County of Hawaii rely on them and furthermore need to trust them in these critical times. Which is why I ask this question: Why do we not have a Tsunami Scale System on our island? Our tsunami evacuation plan is either all or nothing? I would think it would have minimum of three categories. The evacuation procedures could be relative to the threat. As with a drought, in which we have moderate, severe, extreme categories. If we keep moving people out of their homes 500 feet from the water for an 8-inch surge, eventually they will not go. Wave inundations obviously vary but we evacuate people whose homes survived the 1946 and 1960 tsunamis when we expect only a foot or two of sea level change.

Tsunamis will continue to be a fact of life for island residents and I feel we could save a lot of energy, money and time if we develop procedures relative to the threat.

Travis Clark

Laupahoehoe

 

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